Some facts about fasting, part 1

Destroying the propaganda

 

This is the first part of an article series about fasting that I will work on whenever I have time and energy during my recovery and healing from my nano/Morgellons disease. My goal, and hope, with these articles is to inspire, encourage, and help people to try out fasting for improved health, and/or fat loss, and to heal themselves to the best of their abilities.

 

Reader Warning:

If you’re indoctrinated with the bro-science of the fitness industry, the brainwashing propaganda from the food industry, the pharmaceutical industry, and parts of the “health care”-system, the following blog-post might be controversial for you – and your programming will probably fight it. But try to stay with me. Absorb the information and do your own research.
Those of us who actually have worked with thousands of clients for 25+ years and study health, longevity, nutrition and everything in between on a daily basis (and read studies, both new and especially older studies, that are not financially backed by the previous mentioned industries), know that the following information is tried and true.
Don’t be a slave or a shill to the food- and pharmaceutical industry! Drop the chains that are choking your brain and seek out the truth!

 

Let’s start with the most common misbeliefs regarding fasting. These are:

  • Fasting slows metabolism and puts you in “starvation mode”
  • Fasting makes you burn muscle mass
  • Fasting causes low blood sugar
  • Fasting deprives the body of nutrients

 
The funny thing about the common misinformed opinions about fasting is that if someone is fasting because of religious beliefs or is doing a 2-day fast before undergoing surgery or a colonoscopy, no one bats an eye. The response is usually, “good for you, two days is not that hard. You can do it!”
But if you say you’re doing a 2-day fast to feel better and/or cut some body fat, everyone is screaming, “oooh maah gawd, you’re going to starve! You’ll lose all your muscle and die.”
Funny how that works, right?

 

Misbelief #1: slowdown of metabolism


Oh noes. Iz so tired. My metabolism has stopped. Damn you fasting.

Let us approach this logically and with baby steps. Although our ‘known’ written history is sketchy at best, we do know that the human race has survived a lot of hardships. We are designed to be hunters and gatherers, which requires you to be successful in finding food if you want to eat. There are still tribes today that are hunters and gatherers, and they do quite well. And even when the majority of our civilization learned how to farm, disasters struck from time to time and all crops were lost. So, consider the survival situation as the seasons turn and food availability varies greatly. If short-term fasting would lower our metabolism and cause us to lose precious functional muscle, humans as a species would not likely have survived.

In fact, metabolism speed up during fasting. This makes perfect sense from a survival standpoint. If we do not eat, our bodies use our stored energy as fuel to keep us alert and energetic so we can successfully hunt, collect, and search for more food.

This is the whole point of us being able to store body fat in the first place – so we have something to tap into if there’s no food available.
Studies demonstrate this phenomenon clearly. In one, fasting every other day for twenty-two days resulted in no measurable decrease in Basal Metabolic rate (BMR.) There was no “starvation mode.”
Fat oxidation (fat burning) increased 58 percent, from 64 g/day to 101 g/day. Carbohydrate oxidation decreased 53 percent, from 175 g/day to 81 g/day. This means that the body has started to switch over from burning sugar to burning fat, with no overall drop in energy production.
In another study, four days of continuous fasting increased BMR by 12 percent. Levels of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (noradrenaline), which prepares the body for action, increased by 117 percent, keeping energy levels high. Fatty acids in the bloodstream increased over 370 percent as the body switched over from burning food to burning stored fats.

Zauner et al., “Resting Energy Expenditure in Short-Term Starvation Is Increased as a Result of an Increase in Serum Norepinephrine.

 

Misbelief #2: rapid muscle loss


I’m so triggered! You must eat at least 10 times a day or you’ll lose all your gains!!1!1!

The next persistent myth of fasting – especially in the fitness industry – is the belief that fasting will ‘eat up’ muscle. That our body, if we’re not eating, will immediately start using our precious muscle mass as an energy source. This belief illustrates both a lack of logical thinking and a lack of fundamental understanding of physiology.

This misbelief probably comes from the “reasoning” that if a severe calorie restriction diet makes you lose muscle mass, fasting (as in not eating at all), will make you lose even more. Again, believing this is faulty reasoning and displays a lack of research on the topic.

 
Sure, if you’re used to eating every third hour and consume a lot of carbohydrates – so that your fat-storage hormone insulin is elevated most of the day – your body doesn’t really know how to use body fat for fuel. In this scenario, you will lose a little muscle mass if you throw yourself into a fast without any prior preparation. It would probably take 3 to 4 days before you enter ketosis and start to feel a little bit better. And it would take another 2 to 3 weeks before you get somewhat ‘fat adapted’ and start to really tap into fat as an energy source. This is why I always recommend to start with a ketogenic diet before transitioning into a fast; so you can re-learn how to burn fat efficiently. Read my previous blog posts for more information about this.

Let’s get back to the topic. The human body is designed to survive periods of fasting (as in being fasted from lack of food sources.) We store our “food energy” as body fat and use this as fuel when food is not available. Muscle, on the other hand, is extremely valuable and is therefore preserved until body fat becomes so low that the body has no choice but to turn to muscle for sustaining bodily functions. This will only happen when total body fat is at less than 4 percent.
If we did not preserve muscle when no food was available, we would not have survived very long as a species. Almost all mammals have this same ability.
Real-world studies on fasting show that this hold true. Alternate-day fasting over seventy days decreased body weight by 6 percent, but fat mass decreased by 11.4 percent and lean mass (muscle and bone) did not change at all.

Bhutani et al., “Improvements in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Indicators by Alternate-Day Fasting Involve Adipose Tissue Modulations.”

 

As you start fasting, carbohydrate oxidation will increase for the first twenty-four to forty-eight hours, until your body runs out of glycogen (as stored in the liver and muscle cells.) With no more sugar to burn, the body switches to burning fat. Fat oxidation increases as carbohydrate oxidation decreases toward zero.
At the same time, protein oxidation, such as muscle, for fuel actually decreases. The normal protein breakdown of around seventy-five grams per day falls to fifteen to twenty grams per day during fasting. Rather than burning muscle during fasting, we start preserving muscle. Much of the amino acids that are broken down during regular turnover of cells are reabsorbed into new proteins.
This is called autophagy – where the body breaks down damaged cells and cells/protein that is not needed. This is why people who lost a lot of weight can lose all their excess skin from utilizing long-term fasting, as the now useless skin is broken down and recycled as amino acids for energy and repair.
This is not possible on a calorie-reduced diet, as you need to be fasting to activate autophagy. Also, as long as you are on a calorie-reduced diet, no matter the number of calories, your daily protein breakdown will still be at around 75 grams a day. But if you’re fasting, it’s five times lower!

Also, consider other stress-factors, overuse of low-intensity exercise, and so on. This is why people tend to lose more muscle mass and damage their metabolism on stupid very-low-calorie-diets (VLCD) than when doing a more sensible diet and alternating days, or several days, of fasting. We will explore this in more depth in following parts of this article series.


From my fasting and ketogenic diet experiment in mid-2016. Actually gained muscle mass.

Once again, apply some logic. Why would your body store excess energy as fat if it would start to burn muscle protein as soon as food would become unavailable? Muscles, tendons, and other proteins are functional tissues and are very important to our chances of survival. They are not designed to function as energy reserves. To burn muscle for energy would be like storing firewood for the winter and as soon as cold weather and snow hits, you’d start chopping up your furniture and throwing it into the fireplace.
In all seriousness, fasting is actually one of the most potent stimuli for growth hormone secretion; and increased growth hormone helps maintain lean body mass (as well as a young and healthy skin and joints.) In studies that used drugs to suppress growth hormone in fasted subjects, there was a 50 percent increase in protein oxidation (muscle loss).

Also, gaining muscle mass (or losing muscle mass) is mostly a function of exercise. Stuffing your face with food and drinking weight gainers does not build muscle mass. That’s wishful thinking. Carefully planned pre- and post-workout nutrition might help to maximize your efforts. But it’s still intense exercise, such as weight training, where you keep challenging your body, that actually stimulate muscle growth. Muscle is mainly about exercise, and body fat is mainly about diet.
If you’re worried about muscle loss, do more of the exercise that built your muscle in the first place, and do less of exercise that raises muscle wasting cortisol such as low intensity cardiovascular exercise.

And for the record, don’t confuse long-term diets with a 7-day, 14-day or even a 21-day fast. When fasting, your body will do everything in its power to stay as strong and healthy for as long as possible. Only your pre-nutritional status, your level of fat adaption, and the amount of body fat you can burn will limit how long you can fast without ill-effects. Remember, once your body fat goes below a total of 4 percent, you will risk starvation because there is not enough fat to be released as energy on a continuous basis to keep the body going. But until then, if you’re fat adapted, muscle loss will be minimal.

On a long-term calorie-reduced diet on the other hand, you still get calories and some nutrients. Your body will simply perceive it as starvation and there will be no protective hormonal response (as with fasting). This is why it’s so important to get enough nutrients to support hormone production, enzyme production, vitamin- and mineral status, maintain a proper electrolyte balance, and so on, while on a long-term diet aimed at fat loss. If you lose muscle mass on a fat loss diet, it’s because you do too much harmful exercise, too little muscle building exercise or simply do not get enough nutrients (usually not enough fats and minerals). In other words, if you get help from a coach or a personal trainer and you lose muscle mass, that person lacks knowledge and understanding of the body, and you should turn to someone else.
If they say that muscle loss is unavoidable on a ‘fat loss’ diet, simply reply with, “good bye”.

To be continued in the next part where we will look at blood sugar and deprivation of nutrients. Until then, take care and stay healthy!

 

By | 2018-05-27T19:13:26+00:00 May 27th, 2018|Fighting Morgellons and Tumors|0 Comments

My Path to Recovery, part 3

Day 6 and 7 of my 7-day fast and the aftermath

 

Part 1 is available here: http://bartoll.se/fighting-morgellons-and-tumors/my-path-to-recovery-part-1/
Part 2 is available here: http://bartoll.se/fighting-morgellons-and-tumors/my-path-to-recovery-part-2/

All previous and future posts will be available in this category:
http://bartoll.se/category/fighting-morgellons-and-tumors/

 

Saturday, April 21: sixth day – sweet wonderful water

Water never tasted this good.
Water never tasted this good.

I had some problem sleeping due to pain and stiffness in my lower back – the exact spot where I had an injury back in 2000. This sensation is from the boosted repair process – as in breaking down scar tissue and remodeling. I could not find any sleep position that was comfortable, so I tossed and turned most of the night. Actually, I only got about 3 hours of sleep and got up at close to 3 am in the morning. However, I was still feeling somewhat better (especially mental energy and clarity) than previous months – and that’s after six days of fasting and with mild sleep deprivation. That says a lot of the power of fasting.

Urination was still regular with 150 to 250 ml every 3 to 4 hours. No color or odor as far as I could tell. This constant production of urine is another confirmation of being in deep and efficient ketosis.

During the night and at some very short moments in the early forenoon I did experience stronger- and faster-than-usual heartbeats. This was only noticeable when lying down in bed (when I was trying to sleep) and when I had a powernap – and it was only for 10 seconds or so.

I felt really energetic and good in the morning. At noon my mouth felt a little bit sticky and my voice was a little bit off. But still not to any degree that it bothered me. I also felt restless with high mental clarity, but with no real desire to do anything mental or physical.

Lower back still sore and during the day my right arm started to ache – exactly where I broke it in early 2001. Especially the brachialis and the mid triceps felt really sore. And yes, that’s exactly where my bone healed with a slight angle and where I have some deep scar tissue and trigger points. My body is simply healing these spots by recycling damaged and useless tissue (autophagy.)

I broke my dry fast at 6 pm to give me a few hours to rehydrate before hitting the bed. That resulted in 51 hours without any liquids at all. I started with sipping on a glass of cold distilled water and then threw in some sodium (sea salt) at the side. A few hours later I had some additional potassium and magnesium with even more sodium and some regular cold tap water (the tap water in my city is decent, so no worries.)

Since I began drinking water again I also took a nice footbath in room-temperature water. Why not hot water? Well, A few hours before I ended my dry fast, my body temperature had increased a little, probably from detoxifying and repairing (which is in overdrive on a dry fast.) A lot of old toxins that was being released, and the lymph system and lymph nodes was without a doubt working overtime.
Later in the evening I actually ran a fever of 38.8 Celsius (101.84 F.)

The thing is, if you’re healthy and do a water fast, or a dry fast, with the goal to repair an injury, re-booting your immune system, or simply to improve some health markers, it’s not that tough. My previous 7-day water fast when I was fairly healthy was a breeze compared to this one.
You see, if your body is fighting multiple injuries and/or other health problems, it can be really tough. The toxic load can be immense, and you will feel really drained and lethargic – maybe to a degree that you might have to step back, do some maintenance, and then do a new fast in a month or two.

With that being said, I was not going to quit early. Being uncomfortable or feeling lethargy and/or pain have never bothered me. I know my body and I was going to stick with it to the end. After all, the only reason I didn’t plan a 10- or 14-day fast was the realization that it would be too tough on my organs and body, and with my very low body fat, it could back fire instead as a lot of energy is required. Fasting for too long with a low body fat could push you into starvation, and that is never healthy. So, 7 days it is. Then stabilize, do the epigenetics diet, and then probably another water and dry fast – where I might extend it to 10 days.

 

Sunday, April 22: seventh day – breaking the fast

Fever down to 37.5 Celsius (99.5 F), which is just above my normal body temperature of 36.8 to 37.2 C. Still experiencing some pain and stiffness where the body is healing. Other than that, I’m feeling pretty decent.

I broke the fast at 6 pm by consuming 300 ml of homemade orange juice, followed 30 minutes later by eating an orange (very slowly – chewing as much as possible.) Two hours after that I had some flaky cod with butter, avocado, and cooked “mushy” vegetables to make it easier on the digestion (broccoli, carrots, and cauliflower.) And as always, chewing until it turns into a liquid.

If you’ve ever done a longer fast, then you know what a rich and amazing experience it is to taste food again. It is truly a transcendental experience!
The flavors are more intense, vibrant, and living; and the textures are much more distinct and noticeable. The only way to truly appreciate the gift of food and drink is to live without them for a while.

 

Monday, April 23: the day after – reflections

Body temperature was back to normal this morning. Still feeling a bit drained and “off” after the massive dump of toxins and from the healing that took place – especially during and right after the second dry fast.
Not hungry at all. I’m actually feeling full after only half a plate of food – probably from a temporarily shrunk stomach, lower production of stomach acid and thus slower emptying rate.

With all this in mind, I do not recommend dry fasting to anyone who hasn’t done at least a previous 7-day water fast. If you have high levels of toxicity and some health issues (as I do, and most people do in modern life to various degrees), you will experience some really nasty detox symptoms. With a dry fast, the cleansing is very fast and very, very powerful.
Therefore, my suggestion is, if you want to try fasting or even dry fasting for its healing properties, you need to approach it gradually. I would break it down in these steps:

  1. Get accustom to the ketogenic diet – get fat adapted. You need to teach your body to use fat and ketones for fuel. It usually takes 2 to 4 weeks to get fat adapted to a degree that you feel fine on a ketogenic diet.
  2. Try a 24 to 36 hour fast. You will experience short bursts of hunger, because you’re programmed and used to eat several times a day.
  3. Try a 3 to 5-day water fast. Hunger will disappear by the third day. You will probably experience more mental clarity than you ever had before. If you have a lot of toxicity, you might feel a bit lethargic by day 4 or 5.
  4. Try a 7-day water fast. You should be good. Perhaps a little fatigued at times, especially if you need to detox and heal. If you felt drained, weak and lethargic, repeat a 7-day water fast after a month or so before even considering a dry fast.
  5. Try a 36-hour dry fast. Start with a water fast for at least 2 days, then cut water.
  6. Try a 48 to 60-hour dry fast. Once again, ease into it by starting off with a water fast.

There you have it. A simple strategy guide to gradually get into fasting. If you’ve read this series thus far and all the provided links to previous articles, you should be familiar with each and every step by now.

 

April 24 and 2 weeks forward: The aftermath

This is what I’ve noticed during the two following weeks after completing the 7-day fast with two shorter dry fasts.


April 8, 1 week before starting the fast – looking a bit worn and fatigued.

The first thing I noticed was that my ability to focus and concentrate had increased quite a bit. Before the fast, I could only focus on writing for 15 to 20 minutes – after that I had to start re-read what I just wrote several times to remember how to continue or to get new ideas. Same with reading – after 20 minutes or so, the words would begin to float and the information would not really stick.  Also, my eyes would get tired and my vision blurry within a few hours – especially in the afternoon.
Now however, I can easily focus for an hour or more. I actually have to hold myself back, because if I try to write and “work” as I used to before I got sick, I will get drained and almost apathetic for several hours before I recover and can focus again. I learned this the hard way as I usually get overly immersed and “lose track of time” when writing or reading. So, while all this has improved, I still have a long way to go.

Another thing I noticed was that I could handle a lot more fats in my meals. Before the fast I could run into trouble when exceeding 120 grams a day. Now I can easily consume 250 grams of fat a day. Actually, my digestion has been pretty much perfect since finishing the fast.

It’s the same with protein. I can now consume more than 20 to 25 grams in one sitting without albumin showing up in my urine. And I don’t get the same level of inflammation and water retention when experimenting with more protein in the diet. Still, I’m more than happy with 80 to 120 grams of protein a day. I don’t really need more; so, there’s no need to push it or experiment with a higher intake.

Before the fast I could experience some pain and stiffness in my lower back when sitting for too long (where I had my old injury.) Now, I haven’t felt a thing in the two weeks that have passed.


1 week after fasting – looking healthier and gained some muscle mass. And sorry for the bad image quality – a lot of muscle definition and veins has been smooth out.

No noticeable muscle loss. You obviously lose glycogen and water from your muscle cells, making you look smaller and somewhat flatter during a fast. But due to the muscle protein sparing effects of fasting, there’s very little muscle loss as long as you don’t go into starvation. I will cover this in the next blog post (and many other myths.)
It only took a few days of eating to “fill out” and actually look better and somewhat bigger than before starting the fast.

And finally, when I’m in the gym it’s now a bit easier to activate the nervous system and get that crucial feeling of alertness, focus, body awareness and presence. The muscle-mind connection is a little bit better. It’s still not like it used to be, where I could just enter the gym and start ramping the weight to both warm-up, activate, and potentiate the nervous system and feel 100 % in the zone on the first set.
Now I can feel my muscles contracting against the resistance after 10 to 15 minutes of working with the nervous system. Before the fast, it could take 30 minutes – or not happen at all. It’s a small and important improvement.

To summarize, I’ve noticed a lot of small and significant improvements. I still have a long way to go, but these experiences and the results once again show that you can heal your own body. It might take months or years. But it’s the only real way back to health.

 

Observations after 3 weeks

During the last 4 or 5 days (little over 2 weeks since the fast), I’ve noticed a small decay in the positive effects the fasting brought me. My mental energy and my ability to focus for longer periods of time have declined slightly. While my stomach is mostly fine, it can act up a little from time to time.
This is without a doubt because of my illness and the large tumor with “unidentifiable” mass (nano/Morgellons) in my left leg.
My body is still under constant attack, and although the fast did an enormous amount of healing, the illness is still present and it slowly eats away at you.

In other words, I still need to do a lot of healing. Keeping with the ketogenic diet as a safe and anti-inflammatory base. Diving deeper into an epigenetics diet (still doing research and applying some stuff), and even more importantly, doing more long-term fasts.
Actually, I’m already longing for another dry fast. Considering my illness, I really miss the temporary boost in mental energy and clarity – and all the health benefits I could actually feel and experience following the fast. So, with this in mind, I will probably do another fast within 1 or 2 weeks.
Since I finished the previous fast, I’ve been eating really well; re-gaining some more muscle mass (that I lost in late 2016 and early 2017), and my mineral status should be excellent.
So, another fast (only a month after the first one) should not be a problem, just the opposite, in fact. I’ll keep you updated!

In my next blog post, I’ll write more about fasting and how it works. Busting some myths, explaining the huge difference between starvation (unwilling scenario) and fasting (willing scenario), why your metabolism may slow down and you lose muscle on a calorie reduced diet, while metabolism actually revs up and your muscle mass is protected during a fast, and much more.

 

By | 2018-05-15T09:30:05+00:00 May 14th, 2018|Fighting Morgellons and Tumors|0 Comments

My Path to Recovery, part 2

Day 1 to 5 of my 7-day fast

 

Step one in my plan to recovery was a simple ketogenic diet to make sure that I was in fairly deep ketosis before starting step 2. That brings us to this post, which will cover the second step – my 7-day fast. You can find the first part in the series by clicking here. http://bartoll.se/fighting-morgellons-and-tumors/my-path-to-recovery-part-1/

All previous and future posts will be available in this category:
http://bartoll.se/category/fighting-morgellons-and-tumors/

 

Sunday, April 15: preparation and start


My typical Keto-Chicken Salad

Today I had my last meal at 12 pm. Considering gastric emptying and digestion time of about 6 hours, my fast officially started at about 6 pm.
The meal was pretty light in order to speed up digestion time. It consisted of some leafy vegetables, cod, and some runny eggs – and of course a lot of sodium. While sodium and other electrolytes are extremely important for your health, they’re even more important when you start a fast or a ketogenic diet, since they get flushed out with all the water weight you initially lose.
In the evening I had a little sodium, magnesium, and potassium. Water intake at pretty much normal levels of 4 liters a day (1 US gallon).

 

Monday, April 16: first day – a total shambles, or was it?

Woke up at about 4 am with a headache, a slight fever, and 30 minutes later I was vomiting all over the place. Yeah, stomach flu – what a perfect start on my 7-day fast. In essence, this means that my fast will begin with an unintended dry fast – since I can’t hold any liquid at all.

I spent most of the day either in bed or in the bathroom. I did manage to listen to some Alpha (8-12 Hz) sound waves and some other relaxing meditation music while doing some red-light therapy. This helped with the headache and got me some short powernaps. And although I was feeling terrible from the flu, I was at least fasting. In other words, not all of the time spent in bed was a waste.

 

Tuesday, April 17: second day – the light at the end of the tunnel

Still down with the stomach flu. Same as yesterday. It was not until in the late evening that I could get a little bit of water and sodium (sea salt) in me without it coming straight out again. And once I got some fluids in me, and especially some sodium and other electrolytes (in tiny amounts), I recovered quickly and felt pretty good once it was time to hit the bed – even the fever was gone.
This means that I was actually dry fasting, (and unfortunately losing some additional fluids through vomiting), for 44 hours. Well, that’s one way to “kick-start” your fast…

 

Wednesday, April 18: third day – rehydrate, regroup, charge forward!


Sodium in the form of mineral rich sea salt.

Due to the stomach flu, my focus today was solely on rehydration. Not as much in drinking tons of water, but as in getting a lot of electrolytes – divided into small doses throughout the day. All-in-all about 10 grams of sodium, 1 grams of magnesium orotate, 1 gram of calcium citrate malate (did not have orotate), and 6000 mg potassium citrate.

I felt good today. A bit light headed at times when suddenly moving around, but that’s to be expected after 2 days of stomach flu and great losses of electrolytes. I did also feel some “emotional” resistance towards doing any physical activity, which is also to be expected. Mental clarity and mental energy somewhat elevated. Not as much as on my previous fasts at day 3, but still noticeable – and compared to the last year of my nano/Morgellons “disease”, my mental clarity and mental energy was slightly higher than it’s ever been.

To speed up the detoxification process, I also enjoyed a nice foot bath in the evening. To really pull out all the crap, I have several formulas that work wonders. Just make sure that you have a bucket that let you sink your feet and ankles in to cover them all the way up to your calf muscles. Make sure it’s hot and soak for 20 to 30 minutes.

  • Foot bath variant 1: distilled water, 1.5 dl (0.6 cup) of sea salt, and 2 dl (0.8 cup) of white vinegar.
  • Foot bath variant 2: distilled water, 1.5 dl (0.6 cup) of sea salt, and 1 dl (0.4 cup) of pure baking soda (bicarbonate).
  • Foot bath variant 3: distilled water, 1 dl (0.4 cup) of sea salt, 1 dl (0.4 cup) of citric acid, and if available, 2 capsules of DMSO.

 

If you have discoloring of the skin, edema/swelling, bad circulation or any other noticeable condition around your feet and ankles, just try it. You’ll notice changes after the first bath. Take before and after photos and be amazed.

 

Thursday, April 19: fourth day – my mind is speeding, starting a dry fast

Yesterday evening my mind was racing all over the place. My “disease” was still prevalent as I couldn’t really focus for any long periods of time and I didn’t feel compelled to do any writing or reading/studying (which was all I did on previous fasts once the cognitive overdrive kicked in), but my brain was full of thoughts and ideas. I had to meditate for 20 minutes to calm my mind before I could actually go to sleep. This was a good sign that I’ve entered really deep ketosis and my brain got “high” on ketones (the brain’s preferred fuel.)
Another proof of the deep state of ketosis, and that the detoxification process has really begun; was a barely noticeable smell from my armpits. My sweat never smells (as I never use deodorants or other toxins, and I only shower with soap when absolutely necessary – as soap destroys your natural oil production and messes with the pH of the skin).
I only use natural oils for my skin (if needed) and coconut oil mixed with a little baking soda as a natural deodorant when needed. Never use commercial deodorants, and if it contains aluminum – throw it as far away from you as you possible can.

I felt alert most of the day. Cognitive functions still improving. However, on a fast, how you feel can change from hour to hour due to release of toxins and the fact that your body begin to repair old injuries, start to rebuild your immune system, and all that good stuff (that can be quite taxing on the body.)

I also started my “real” dry fast today and had my last water at 3 pm – for a total of 2 liters (half a US gallon). Since I started the fast with an unwilling dry fast of 44 hours, the goal is to go without water for 48 hours or slightly more if I feel fine.

The detoxifying effect is a lot stronger when dry fasting compared to water fasting. So, by putting in a short dry fast during a water fast, I minimize the possible side-effects while accelerating the detoxifying and healing process. It’s like hitting the nitrogen-switch mid race to make it into first place.

I would never recommend jumping directly into a dry fast, just as you should never jump directly into a water fast. To make it as easy as possible, always make sure that you are already in ketosis when you begin your fast. And if you plan to do a longer fast (3 days or more), make sure that you are fat adapted. That is, that your body is used to, and capable of, efficiently burning fat and utilizing ketones for energy. If not, you will feel miserable while your body is adjusting – and that is simply unnecessary. Also, always add extra sodium and electrolytes in the beginning – or you will experience the common “keto flu” – as in lethargy, headaches, and fatigue. Something that are extremely easy to avoid by simply increasing electrolytes (especially sodium).

When I went to sleep, it still felt like any other night on a fast. My mind was still racing a little bit due to deep ketosis and that my body hasn’t really adjusted yet to the abundance of wonderful ketones. But I slept a bit better than the previous days.

 

Friday, April 20: fifth day – no water for you buddy

If you’re wondering about dry fast and its dangers, here’s a quick introduction/explanation of what it is and how it works.
As I mentioned earlier, you need to be in ketosis before entering into a dry fast. The reason for this is simple. Once ketosis is established, the breakdown of fat to provide fuel releases water as a byproduct. In metabolizing fat molecules, excess hydrogen atoms are released from the fat which combine in the blood with oxygen forming H2O. This so-called “metabolic water” can then help to substitute for the lack of drinking water. However, if you jump straight into a dry fast from a normal diet, you end up depleting your body’s water reserves during the period in which it takes to establish ketosis, which thereby curtails how long you can safely stay on a dry fast.
Even worse, if you’re still actively digesting carbohydrates when you cut the water and the dry fast begins, your “carbohydrate-based metabolism” will require water in order to operate, thereby further draining you of your water reserves.

This means that if you consume a typical diet with some carbohydrates and simply stop eating and drinking, you will feel miserable. And if your body never has been in ketosis before and is a long cry from fat adapted, it could get dangerous really quick. Probably within 2 or 3 days. Not to mention what could happen in a hot climate and/or if you sweat a lot. That is why the saying is that you can only last 2 to 3 days without water.

However, if you’re in ketosis and are somewhat fat adapted, a lot of water will be reintroduced into your system by your metabolism of converting fat into fuel. In this scenario, most people can go without water safely for 5 to 7 days. That’s a huge difference and a really potential way to repair and heal your body in the shortest time possible!
Since this is my first real dry fast ever, I’m shooting for 2 days, or 48 hours.

As for my own experiences today, I did wake up with a dry mouth – as most people do anyway in the morning. The dry feeling went away within 10 to 15 minutes and my production of saliva was normal during the rest of the day. I did get a little bit of frothy saliva a few times during the day, which is part of the detoxifying process. Just spit it out and you’re fine.
Peeing continued as clockwork throughout the day. About 200 ml every four to five hours – and pretty much transparent. Almost no coloring, and no noticeable odor.
In the evening I did start to notice some lower back pain. Not the kidneys, but the muscles and surrounding tissues – exactly where I had an injury from slipping during the racking sequence after a back squat back in the year 2000. This old injury has acted up once in a while since then, especially after inactivity due to sickness/lay-offs from training or simply working too much in front of a desk/computer.

I also felt somewhat physically stronger today and gladly moved about a bit and did some errands outdoors.

 

Part 3 is online here: http://bartoll.se/fighting-morgellons-and-tumors/my-path-to-recovery-part-3/

 

Thank you for reading! 

 

By | 2018-05-14T18:44:07+00:00 April 30th, 2018|Fighting Morgellons and Tumors|0 Comments

My Path to Recovery, part 1

A quick review of my strategy

 

Me at the orthopedics office on April 9, 2018.
Me at the orthopedics office on April 9, 2018.

Let us begin with a summery of the last month. If you need to catch up, follow this link and then return to this page.

I did an MRI on my left leg on December 21, 2017, and in late March I finally got word from the orthopedics in Västerås. I had a meeting with one of their experts on April 9th and learned that the “tumor”, as imaged by the MRI in December, was a lot larger than we anticipated (7,5 cm (3”) wide at the top, 3 cm (1.2”) thick, 16 cm (6.3”) in length and 3 cm (1.2”) in width at the bottom). As of now, they’re still discussing what approach to take. With that being said, I’m going to ask for a new MRI to compare if there have been any changes in size, and then demand a surgery as soon as possible.
As the previous mass removed from my right leg, this one is many times larger and seem to consist of the same nano/Morgellon fibers and a lot of scar tissue. Simply put, you don’t want that in your leg.
Also, you can only feel a little bit of the upper part of the “tumor” on the outside of the leg as it has grown into the muscle. Only a few centimeters are visible to the eye. This means, that although the lump that you can feel on the outside of the leg hasn’t grown, there’s no telling if it has continued to grow inwards and/or downwards toward the knee. It might very well be larger now than it was when I had my last MRI in December of 2017.

As for my other symptoms of brain fog, fatigue, lethargy, reduced vision, reduced motor skills, and so on – I’ve managed to stabilize my condition and halt the decline with light rehab training (weightlifting three times a week) and by going back to a ketogenic diet with only some minor amounts of high quality carbohydrates in the evening. Reconnecting with someone very important in my life has also helped as lot, as we tend to motivate each other.
I’ve also done some time-proven “detox” procedures (that I will describe in upcoming posts.)
So, during April, I have actually felt a little bit better than previous months, and because of that, I’ve had a little more energy to study and plan – which leads us to my current experiment to improve my health and hopefully start to heal.

If you’re new to this blog-series, here’s my first post from November 2017:
http://bartoll.se/uncategorized/update-severely-ill/

All previous and future posts will be available in this category:
http://bartoll.se/category/fighting-morgellons-and-tumors/

Now, on to the experiment…

 

In simple steps, the plan looks like this:

  1. A ketogenic diet at about 2000 kcal a day, comprising of about 81 to 83 % fat, 14 to 15 % protein and less than 3 % net carbohydrates – to put me in deep ketosis. I started this on April 10.
  2. A 7-day fast to heal my body as much as possible and to rejuvenate/rebuild the immune system. The fast will be split into 3 stages. First stage is a common water fast for 2 to 3 days with a lot of sodium and electrolytes. This will be followed by a 2-day dry fast (no liquid at all), which will accelerate the healing process. And the third stage is a transition into a water fast again.
    I started this on April 15.
  3. To break the fast I will have an orange (only 20g of carbohydrates, which will not put me out of ketosis), followed an hour later by steamed mushy vegetables and some easy to digest white fish. I will then transition into the previous ketogenic diet again for a few days.
  4. This is where the real experiment starts. I will shift into a tailored ketogenic diet with the aim to correct my COMT (fast), MAOA, and the GST/GPX genes trough the science of epigenetics. This will be divided into several steps.

 

I will write about each of these steps. How I plan my days, what I eat, other strategies I employ, how I feel, and my experience in whole.

If you’re new to fasting, I did my first real “long-term” 7-day water fast back in 2016. You can read about it here:
http://bartoll.se/articles-2016/my-7-day-fasting-experiment/

Since step one was a simple ketogenic diet, I will start with step 2 in my next blog post. If you’re interested in the ketogenic diet and want to know more about it, you can read my article series here:
http://bartoll.se/articles-2016/the-ketogenic-diet-part-1/

You can also find my Quick Diet Experiment from 2016 where I went from 7.79 % subcutaneous body fat to 6.29 % in 14 days by utilizing fasting and the ketogenic diet.
http://bartoll.se/the-diet-experiment-2016/quick-diet-experiment-day-15-aftermath/

 

The next post will be up during next week. Until then, take care!

 

By | 2018-04-21T13:57:29+00:00 April 21st, 2018|Fighting Morgellons and Tumors|0 Comments

March update

 

August 2016 vs March 2018.
About 35 lbs difference.

In my last update I mentioned that I had just begun visiting the gym again, doing some easy rehab training. On average, I’ve managed to get about 3 training sessions a week. Each session lasting for about 40 to 50 minutes.
Although it seems to help me a little with “immediate energy” (I feel really good for a few hours post-exercise), it’s a bag of mixed feelings. Don’t get me wrong, I will always love the gym and I feel right at home the moment I step into the weight room. What bugs me a little is how my illness affects my central nervous system and motor skills.
It takes me about 20 to 30 minutes to get any kind of “mind-muscle” connection where I actually feel the muscles working. At the start of a training session, it’s simply like I’m going trough motions without feeling anything at all (it’s almost like an out-of-body experience.) And for more complex multi-joint movements that I’ve been perfecting for more than 20 years – like power cleans, high-pulls, or even the deadlift – I feel awkward and off balance. I can’t get into the rhythm of the movement and there is no real explosiveness to speak of.
So, I mostly keep to cable exercises, some simple dumbbell exercises and two or three machines.

My recovery is also way off from where it used to be. I always train in the morning, I have a small meal when I get back home and then I have a powernap while listening to delta brain wave therapy for better recovery and relaxation. I do the same in the afternoon. This helps a little with my usual declining energy levels and brain fog. I also do some red and infrared light therapy (660nm to 850nm), especially on my face and eyes, which helps with my blurred vision and strained eyes in the afternoon and evening. Unfortunately, my red-light device is very small and a little bit on the weak side, so I have to prioritize the areas I wish to rejuvenate.

At least my abs are still there.

The positive news is that I’ve manage to stabilize my condition and, on some days, I feel a little better than I did two months ago. I’ve also reconnected with someone very dear to me, and we’re staying in close contact on a daily basis, which helps a lot with keeping up one’s spirit (especially after I had to relocate my wolfdog) and continue to find ways to heal myself – since the medical community has yet to do anything to help.
With that said, I still get wiped out after stressful and/or busy days – being abnormally tired and lethargic for days afterwards.

As for the second lump on my left leg, I still haven’t heard a word about surgery. I had the MRI in mid-December last year, which says a lot about the decline of the healthcare system in Sweden.
Fortunately, it hasn’t really grown, which is without a doubt thanks to my diet. Still, it’s clearly visible and I want it removed. Just have to wait I guess.

As for epigenetics (modifying genetic expression to improve your life and health.) My research continues. Since I still have trouble focusing, and my vision easily blur, it’s a slow progress since there are so many other things I want to pursue during the few hours I have energy. Still, it seems that I need to work with my COMT (fast), MAOA, and the GST/GPX genes.
I’m working on some protocols and I will start on them as soon as I’ve had a new visit to the doctor’s office – just in case they want to do something (that might screw everything up, haha.)
I will also document everything and share as much as I can here.

Until then, take care and have a wonderful day!