The Quick Diet Experiment: Day 15 – aftermath

The Aftermath and what comes next…

 

Read the introduction by clicking here! | Day 1-3. | Day 4-6. | Day 7-11. | Day 12-14. (Will open in new window)

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Sunday, June 25. Day 15 – aftermath: ketogenic diet and the next step:

Day "0" versus Day 15. Higher resolution photos at Classic Muscle Newsletter Day “0” versus Day 15. Higher resolution photos at Classic Muscle Newsletter.

Guess what? Yeah, got home late again after collecting 10 big “dino bones” from a friend and staying 2.5 hours at the dog park in the evening. Had to make my last meal for the day at close to 10 PM and then hitting the bed just before 11 PM. Didn’t sleep too well and woke up at 5 AM as clockwork. Yeah, I usually don’t sleep in on weekends when I sleep alone. If sharing a bed, I usually get up early, get some important work done, and then slip back into bed.
But yeah, sleep this night was not the best. And my morning weight was slightly up by 300 grams (0.66 lbs.), putting the scale at 70.2 kg (154.4). It’s actually what I weighed on June 22.
I took new photos at 7.30 AM. Not the best of conditions and it was freezing having to open the balcony door to let some early morning light inside. But it had to be done. Hopefully you can notice some small changes (although it’s only been 5 days since the last photo).
I also got a new body comp done and I’ve lost yet a few millimeters at most measuring sites. According to the 9-site Parrillo formula, my subcutaneous body fat is now at about 6.29 % – quite a drop from 7.79 % in just 14 days – especially considering that my body fat was “low-ish” to begin with.

Day "0", day 5, day 10, and day 15. Day “0”, day 5, day 10, and day 15. Higher resolution photos at Classic Muscle Newsletter.

And speaking of body weight and body composition. Although fluid retention changes from day to day, I think I’ve actually gained some muscle mass during this experiment. When I started, I weighed 73.5 kg (161.7 lbs.) with a lot of muscle glycogen (which binds water inside the cells) and I had quite a lot of fluid retention beneath the skin. Now, after 14 days of a pretty restricted ketogenic diet (including three instances of 36 hours without protein and only about 200 to 300 kcal), I weigh 70.2 kg. That’s only a loss of 3.3 kg (7.26 lbs.) The skin fold caliper body composition test says I lost about 1.25 kg (2.75 lbs.) of body fat, which might actually be pretty correct considering that it’s only been 14 days – and that would come down to 625 grams (1.375 lbs.) a week on average. That is about as much as my body can release in fatty acids at this level of leanness. At the start, I had about 5.7 kg of subcutaneous fat. At my level of leanness, lifestyle and activity level, I probably have an additional 3.5 to 4.0 kg of intra-fat (the fat surrounding organs and residing behind the abdominal wall). So with about a total of 9.2 to 9.7 kg (20.2 to 21.3 lbs.) of total body fat, I should be able to release and burn about 644 to 679 kcal of fat a day, when using the standard of 70 kcal per kg of body fat formula. That’s about 585 to 617 grams (1.29 to 1.36 lbs.) of fat a week – if perfectly healthy and in an ideal world. And… This number goes down as your fat stores shrink. Today, with at least 1.25 kg less body fat, I would only be able to release and burn 557 to 591 kcal a day, which is 506 to 537 grams (1.11 to 1.18 lbs.) a week.

Body composition sheet.

Body composition sheet.

So yes, I think the “pure fat loss” is pretty accurate. It might look like I lost a lot more, but that would be pretty much physically impossible. And the fact that I look so much “sharper” and ripped is also due to loss of subcutaneous water. Remember that the main reason for doing this experiment was to reduce inflammation, which also reduces water retention.

Considering that I should have lost at least 100 grams of liver glycogen, and 500 grams of muscle glycogen (probably close to 600 grams since I carry more muscle mass than the average man), which binds an additional 1 400 to 1600 grams of water, and at least 1 250 grams of fat, and then adding in the loss of additional subcutaneous fluids/water retention, the math fails – as it adds up to more than the 3.3 kg lost. And that without even considering the water retention.
So only one answer remains. I’ve gained a little bit of muscle mass – on a restricted ketogenic diet with a total of 4.5 days without any protein out of 14 days. According to all the Facebook and YouTube Bro-experts, I would have withered away and lost muscle mass.

It’s a funny thing how the body actually work, respond, and perform when you know what you’re doing instead of following old dogma, myths and bro-science.

So what now?

Shameless selfie. Sucking in and contracting the abs make my arm look bigger. ;) Shameless selfie. Sucking in and contracting the abs make my arm look bigger. 😉

I went into this diet experiment thinking that it would be difficult and challenging at times, especially during the fat only fasts for 36 hours or more without any protein. But truth is that it was extremely easy – and I felt great the whole time. I can see and feel the difference it has done in lowering inflammation and that my body feel “lighter” and “fresher”. It will be interesting to take new blood tests this week and to see if my kidneys are operating better than three weeks ago.

Considering all this, I will continue with a ketogenic diet with the main goal to stay in ketosis most of the day. I will experiment with carbohydrates before and after my training sessions. In other words, I’ll start by adding about 20 to 30 grams of simple carbs before my workout and another 20 to 30 grams of complex carbs after my workout. On my days off from the gym, I’ll do a strict ketogenic diet.

My main goal is, and will be, my health and feeling as good as possible – with an energetic and clear mind. Keeping my body fat as low as possible without noticing any adverse effects is second on my list (since this will minimize inflammation and toxic load), and adding a bit more muscle mass comes third.

Speaking of keeping your body fat low. I’m planning an article about that. There’s simply so much misinformation out there, claiming that low body fat is bad for you; as it will wreck your hormones, contribute to mood swings, lowered attention span and learning difficulties, etcetera.
Still, the observations that exists and warn about these adverse effects are from people who have starved themselves – as in prisoners of war, people with anorexia, etcetera. It’s not the minimal amount of body fat that is the problem in these subjects, it’s how they got there by denying their bodies the nutrients it desperately needs – that is the problem. The diet they followed or was forced to follow destroyed their hormone production, microbiota, electrolytes, etcetera. The low level of body fat is only an effect of energy deprivation, not the causation.

Anyway, I’ll start increasing calories slowly over the coming weeks, but I’ll probably lose another pound of fat or two before I focus on a short muscle gaining phase. I’ll also continue with my fat fasts. At least twice a month, simply because the health benefits of autophagy is enormous. Being in ketosis and activating autophagy is one of the best ways to remove dysfunctional cells and prevent/reverse cancer and other modern diseases. The benefits are so great that not doing regular recurring fasts would simply be extremely stupid. It’s about investing in your health. Besides your family, it’s the most precious gift you have.

I will continue with a journal, documenting the things I’ll do next – and I’ll do my best to share useful and interesting information. Thank you for reading!

 

By | 2016-10-16T14:03:07+00:00 June 29th, 2016|The Diet Experiment 2016|0 Comments

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